07/20/09

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07/29/14

1938 Maccabi Football Club?

From Gabriele Weissmann…

I found this [among] my uncle’s photos. I wonder if anybody recognizes a person. Also, in the background, a building which looks solid enough to have survived the war. Maybe it still stands. I believe it is a Maccabi football team. On the back of the photo is says only “Czernowitz 1938″.
Gabriele

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Click photo to enlarge

07/5/14

Important Czernowitz Dates

From Gaby Rinzler — regarding the list discussion about ‘important Czernowitz dates’:

In an attempt to leave my children and grand children information about my past I made a Geopolitical introduction. It may be pertinent to the present discussion re: what 1848, 28 of March 1914 and 1944, etc. meant to our group.

[Note* See List Archives on the website 2014 Archives II, starting June 27th 2014 for the discussion -- Subject: 28 June 1940.]
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rinzler2

07/5/14

The Czernowitzer Philipp Rubel at the Outbreak of WW I

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Exactly 100 years ago today, on July 5, 1914 the Austrian magazine “Wiener Bilder” leaded on the front page with a photograph, which became an icon of photography for the coming decades. It shows allegedly the capture of Gavrilo Princip, a Bosnian Serb who assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife and provided the pretext for Austria-Hungary’s invasion of Serbia, which then led to World War I.

But was the detained person really Gavrilo Princip? Who was the photographer? How did it come into the media? Questions upon questions! We get the right answers by the Austrian editor and photo historian Anton Holzer, who published his research under the headline “The Murderer, Who Wasn’t”:

http://diepresse.com/home/spectrum/zeichenderzeit/766288/Der-Morder-der-keiner-war

To make a long story short: It wasn’t Gavrilo Princip on the photo, but his schoolmate Ferdo Behr, mistaken for the assassin. The photographer remains anonymus, but the CZERNOWITZER, who brought this photo into orbit was PHILIPP RUBEL, who ran a small postcard publishing company in Vienna, Porzellangasse 60. Above all, Philipp Rubel is related to our fellow member Ken Cutler, who wrote to me in 2012:

“A complete bio of Philipp Rubel, from my standpoint is as yet not possible. What I do know is that he was one of 12 sibs from Cz. He moved to Vienna, married twice and his daughter, Erika, came to the US in 1939 and stayed with my cousin Stanley for about 1 year. Stan lost track of her and I tracked her down and found her son and his children, she passed by the time I found her. Philipp and his wife Sabine were killed or died in the Shoah and Erika made an application for reparations in Austria. I have the address where Philipp and I believe other family members lived from researches and it’s the address indicated at his death. That address matches the letterhead on his letters to Stan’s mother, Helen. He was born 12 Dec 1871 and died 26 Oct 1938. That address was 1090 Porzellangasse 60, Wien, Austria. You have me hooked now, what is the mystery??”

What a thrilling story, but unfortunately, dear Ken, although I tried hard, I didn’t succeed to discover more on Philipp Rubel. On the other hand I’m positive, that you – and others – will enjoy Philipp’s contribution to WW I.

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Porzellangasse 60 in Vienna

07/3/14

Transnistria, Then and Now

The territory of Romanian-ruled Transnistria (1941-44, 42,000 km2 / 16,216 sq mi) is incongruent with and included present-day Transnistria (4,163 km2 / 1,607 sq mi). Learn more on that subject from the disambiguation effected by Daniel Katz by clicking here for a PDF download of Daniel’s presentation, including detailed maps and additional links.

Please remember, Fabius Ornstein’s testimony “The Suffering of the Deportees in Transnistria” is still available at our Blog! On Fabius Ornstein’s life-saving activity in Transnistria we learn from the Jewish Telegraphic Agency report dated July 26, 1943 as follows:

Thousands of Jews in Transnistria Have Not Seen Bread for Months, Hundreds Starving
Thousands of Jewish deportees confined in the various ghettos which the Rumanian occupation authorities have established in Transnistria, the Rumanian-administered section of the Russian Ukraine, have not seen any bread for months and the vast majority of them are threatened with starvation unless some assistance is forthcoming soon, according to private advices received here today. In the township of Copaigorod about 2,220 Jews are confined at present, the report discloses. Under the leadership of one of the deportees, Fabius Ornstein, the Jewish community has organized a free kitchen which has so far managed to distribute about 500 meals twice daily. These ‘meals,’ however, almost always consist of potatoes and nothing else. [...]

Maps of 2 territories named TransnistriaMaps of 2 territories named Transnistria1

06/23/14

“I Remember Them Now” by Laurence Salzmann

Blue Flower Press: In the late 1930′s, there were eight thousand Jews in Rădăuți, a small town in the Bukovina region of Romania. During 1974-76, when the photographer/filmmaker Laurence Salzmann went to Rădăuți on a Fulbright Fellowship, there were only two hundred and forty Jews among the entire population of twenty-two thousand.

“I Remember them Now” is a short film made from newly rediscovered, kodachromes and audio from the Salzmanns’ original time in Rădăuți.