07/11/12

More info from Hedwig…

Here’s what Hedwig says about her new book and the radio interview:

In the emission named “Von Tag zu Tag” (From day to day) ORF 1, on 19 July at 14.05, I think I will speek about the “Paradigma Czernowitz”.and from
the public are coming question, I had one 6 years ago, on 18.Juli at 19. will be opened a big Internationnal Exhibition at the Moja Museum for Modern Art, in the Palace Schoenborn (not Schoebrunn), Renngasse 4, where my son Paul has also 2 pictures, there are 6 israelis, than at 23.July , 19.00, at the bookshop-cafe “Tiempo Nuevo” Taborstr.17 a, I present my book”Zum Andenken und Nachdenken (for memory and reflection), Annexed the invitations.
Thanks
Hedwig

Now these are the attachments that came with Hedwig’s email. It was hard to recover all but one of the attachments as they were in a Microsoft proprietary format which I don’t have access to. I’ll spare you the gruesome details.

Since my German is worse than my Yiddish, I’m hoping that I got the order of things correct. The forth photo should have been in the photo of the first page; It’s the jacket of Hedwig’s book. You will notice that there are also some strange characters in the text that never got converted correctly in the processing. It ain’t poifect, but hopefully, you can make sense out of it.

Best,
jerome

03/2/12

Part 3: Joseph Schmidt, a Star Fell!

ABC Radio National producer Natalie Kestecher visited the Eschenberg Observatory in Switzerland in September 2009 and coducted an interview with Markus Giesser, the Director of the Observatory, who – together with Freimut Börngen, the first discoverer  – named the Joseph Schmidt Asteroid.

ABC Radio National from Australia broadcasted on Saturday, 15 January 2011, the program “A Star Fell – Remembering Joseph Schmidt”, which won a silver medal in the Best Music Special category of the New York Radio Awards.

ABC Radio National: “In this moving account of his life, we hear the songs immortalised by Joseph Schmidt’s voice, as producer Natalie Kestecher searches the archives and the recollections of those old enough to remember. Natalie takes us to a Sydney hospital ward where a former Vienna Mozart choir boy (Erich Troyna) recalls a live radio performance in 1935, and to Switzerland where an astronomer (Markus Griesser) has kept Schmidt’s memory alive by naming an asteroid after him. There too, she visits the Joseph Schmidt archive, lovingly curated by his biographer Alfred Fassbind, a former tenor himself.”