Author Archives: Edgar Hauster

The Keeping of Metrical Books in Bukovina

Ostjüdische Zeitung, Czernowitz, December 29, 1929

The Keeping of the Metrical Books is Transferred to the Municipality. The City Hall issues a public note to the effect that both the keeping of the metrical books definitively is transferred to the municipality and the civil marriage becomes mandatory, effective January 1, 1930. In accordance with the stipulations of the law on the keeping of the metrical books, all births and deaths have to be declared to no person other than the keeper of the metrical books appointed by the municipality. Equally all marriages have to be contracted by the marriage registrar of the municipality. No religious act (circumcision, burial, marriage) will be carried out without agreement of the keeper of the metrical books.

Dr. Gali Tibon, Romania and the Holocaust



Gali Tibon is the founder and CEO of the Institute for excellence in the Humanities and the head of the educational board of the ‘Beit Lohamei Haghetaot’ Ghetto Fighters’ House Museum. From 2014–2015 she was a Postdoctoral Fellow, Sawyer Seminar Postdoctoral Fellowship, at Carnegie Mellon University, Department of History. Her Ph.D. dissertation: ‘The Jewish Leadership of the South Bukovina Communities in the Ghettos in the Mogilev Region in Transnistria, and its Dealings with the Romanian Regime (1941–1944)’ was completed at Tel Aviv University. She has completed an annotated edit of a diary from the Shargorod Ghetto in Transnistria. Tibon is a former high school principal in Bat – Yam and Ma’alot – Tarshicha and won the education prize of The ORT schools net for an outstanding school and its principal, lectures for principals, teachers and administrators from all sectors of Israeli society.

Gali Tibon is among the alumni of the “The Zvi Yavetz School of Historical Studies”. The School of Historical Studies is the center for academic activity in all fields of historical research at Tel Aviv University, and a leading institution for research in Israel and abroad.

ibidem: From summer 1941 onwards, Romania actively pursued at its own initiative the mass killing of Jews in the territories it controlled. 1941 saw 13,000 Jewish residents of the Romanian city of Ia‚i killed, the extermination of thousands of Jews in Northern Bukovina and Bessarabia by Romanian armed forces and local people, large-scale deportations of Jews to the camps and ghettos of Transnistria, and massacres in and around Odessa. Overall, more than 300,000 Jews of Romanian and Soviet or Ukrainian origin were murdered in Romanian- controlled territories during the Second World War. In this volume, a number of renowned experts shed light on the events, the contexts, and the aftermath of this under-researched and lesser-known dimension of the Holocaust. 75 years on, this book gives much-needed impetus to research on the Holocaust in Romania and Romanian-controlled territories [Table of Contents].

Beyond the Nistru • Documentary by Boris Maftsir














Ruth Films, Jerusalem: “On June 22, 1941 – The German and Romanian armies attack the USSR on the southern part of the front. The Romanians aimed to return to the Dniester River and regain control of Bessarabia and North Bukovina which were taken from them in the summer of 1940 by the Soviets. In late August 1941 the Germans grant the Romanian government the region on the east bank of the Dniester River, or as it is known in Romanian – Nistru. Hitler names this area – Transnistria. The film “Beyond the Nistru” depicts some of the Holocaust events that took place during the first year of the greatest patriotic war in Romanian occupied Soviet Union territories. The film enrolls the story of the suffering and death of hundreds of thousands of Jews – victims of the Holocaust perpetrated by the Romanians.”

Read more at:
http://www.ruthfilms.com/beyond-the-nistru.html

http://www.holocaustinussr.com/beyond-the-nistru-witnesses-en/

Jewish Life in Radautz Before, During and After the Holocaust

The working team “War Graves”, founded by Petra and Holger Klawitter at the European School Rövershagen implemented the project “Jewish Life in Radautz Before, During and After the Holocaust” in close cooperation with the Andronic Motrescu College from Rădăuți. On July 4, 2017 I had the privilege to meet Petra, Holger and a few of their pupils in Rövershagen close to the Hanseatic City of Rostock.

The outstanding gifted and dedicated couple, both of them history teachers at the European School Rövershagen, not only founded the working team itself but also erected the rewarded “Holocaust Memorial Railway Wagon” on the school campus. For the implementation of the ongoing project, in March 2017, a small advance team conducted interviews with Holocaust survivors from Rădăuți in Israel, such as Arthur Klinghoffer and Aron Ashkenazy and others. On July 6, 2017 the entire working team set forth on their journey (by bus) to Rădăuți.

In Rădăuți they joined their Romanian counterparts and the entrire working team – assisted by Bondy and Sidi Stenzler (rear row, 2nd and 3rd from left) set to work. Over the course of this very complex biennial project different suboperations will be effected, such as research works at the archives, interviews with the local population, maintenance works at the Jewish Cemetery, installation of a memorial plate inside of the Temple, presentation of a photo exhibition, printing of a comprehensive bilingual brochure in German and Romanian, and much more.

Romanian Media Coverage:
Monitorul de Suceava, July 18, 2017
NewsBucovina, July 17, 2017

Each and any assistance is highly appreciated. Donation account:
Förderverein “Verbundene RegS und GY Rostocker Heide e.V.”
IBAN: DE30130500000295001160
BIC: NOLADE21ROS
Verwendungszweck: AG Kriegsgräber

Tangoul Morții (Tango of Death) for Double Bass

Yehuda Yannay (b. May 26, 1937 in Timișoara, Romania) is an Israeli-American composer, conductor, and media artist. Surviving the Holocaust times and fleeing the subsequent Communist regime, he immigrated with his parents to Israel in 1951. According to Wikipedia, Yehuda Yannay „is the first non-German composer who delved into the complex poetry of Paul Celan, a Holocaust survivor, in its original language…“

Remembering Emmanuel Landau, MD, PhD

Dr. Emmanuel Landau (Courtesy by Rob Gartenberg)

Rob Gartenberg: I will always remember my mother’s cousin Manny (as he called himself after settling in the USA) as a witty man with a generous spirit, a sparkle in his eye and a razor-sharp intellect. We always knew him as Mani, for he was born Manuel Leonid Landau, the initials of his name derived from those of his grandfather, Leibish Mendel Landau, a well-respected rabbi. Leibish’s wife, Ettl Schächte, once said of Manny as a boy:  “Das Kind hat kein Ernst in sich, er will nur spielen!” (The child has no earnestness, he just wants to play). Well, later in life he certainly did develop his serious side, becoming a widely respected professor and medical researcher. But it’s true, he never lost his appetite for laughter. His maternal grandfather was Josef Ohrenstein, who founded and ran the Jewish Hospital in Czernowitz.

Dr. Josef Ohrenstein (Courtesy by Rob Gartenberg)

After being interned in Transnistria, Manny, his parents and his maternal grandfather managed to get onto one of the last boats to Palestine, where people started calling him Emmanuel. This name found its way onto many personal documents, so, to avoid confusion he changed his name to Emmanuel Manuel and dropped the Leonid. His father, Jakob Landau was an eye doctor, his mother, Ida Ohrenstein, worked for a well-known publishing company. Sadly, Manny was not an eager correspondent, so our intermittent meetings were my only opportunity to benefit from his very extensive knowledge and wisdom. I never had a boring conversation with him and wish we’d lived closer together and that our paths had crossed more often. That, in itself, is a tribute to his character: he was someone you wanted to spend time with. My mother grew up with him in Czernowitz, where he lived in Herrengasse (she lived in Taboragasse), close to the old synagogue. Mani was like a younger brother to her and life was good until the Red Army marched in and many Jews had to flee (she among them, though they were later reunited in Palestine). Mani also had an eccentric side to him, accompanying every dinner with a lemon, cut into seven equal pieces, which he then ate. I cannot recall the significance of this, but it gives a small insight into his nature, showing that he liked to give life meaning. He married twice, having two children of whom he was very proud with his second wife, and his last decades were spent living with a third companion, first in New York, then in Atlanta. He is – and will remain – sorely missed by his family.

Click here for the obituary published by the Mount Sinai Alumni Relations Team!

Women and World War II

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Rolle einiger Frauen bei der Rettung von Juden in Rumanien 1941-1945

HAUSLEITNER, Mariana

Abstract

Only a few historians in Romania who did research on the protectors of Jews, highlighted those protectors who were being honored in Yad Vashem. Especially the role of two women became somewhat better known. Viorica Agarici of the Romanian Red Cross got involved in the process of saving several Jews in 1941. The other woman who protested in 1942, when the Germans announced that Jews from Romania were to be deported to the camp Bełżec, was the mother of a young king Mihai called Elena.
To this date, no research has been conducted on the Romanian and Jewish women who got involved in the saving of over 5.000 orphaned children from the Romanian occupation territory Transnistria. Some publications informed about the autonomous Help-Commission at the Jewish Center. The article shows how a group of Jewish women collected garments and medication for the deported Jews from Romania in the camps of Transnistria. They closely cooperated with some Romanian women who distributed these goods through the channels of the Romanian Red Cross. After a long struggle in the spring of 1944, the first orphaned children were repatriated to Romania and were later brought to Palestine by ship in 1944/1945.