The Radautz Vital Records Index Database 1857 – 1929

During the summer of 2016, I traveled to Rădăuţi, Romania, and visited the Archives in the Town Hall. After some negotiations and with a little bit of luck, I was given permission to photograph Jewish vital records for the Rădăuţi, Solca, and Vicov communities of Bukovina; see my blog posting “Books of Seven Seals in Rădăuți and Suceava”. The first database resulting from these efforts is The Radautz Marriage Index Database.

http://www.reisch-family.net/SevenSealsLukePHP/SevenSealsMarriages.html

Every society enlarges itself through marriages. When you are tracing your family history, this information can offer one of the most common missing links – a maiden name. All marriage records include the full names of the bride and groom as well as  the marriage date and other additional information, such as the names and birthplaces of each individual’s parents. As part ONE of an ongoing project – birth & death records will come soon – The Radautz Marriage Index Database is a rich web resource for Jewish heritage in Bukovina. It contains over 3,000 properly indexed marriage records for the period 1870-1929. Copies of family marriage records are freely available upon request.

http://www.reisch-family.net/SevenSealsRadautzDeathIndex/SearchForm.html

NEW: Even if final, but not trivial at all, death records are among the most important of all vital records. Death Indices typically contain the birth date of a person, date of death, cause of death and other details that are helpful in genealogical and historical research. As part TWO of our ongoing project, The Radautz Death Index Database is a rich web resource for Jewish heritage in Bukovina. It contains over 7,500 properly indexed death records for the period 1857-1929; some data refer back to births as early as the middle of the 18th century. Copies of family death records are freely available upon request.

Whether you are looking for an ancestor or trying to find a lost classmate, these records can provide a link to vital information and point you toward important clues. The free search provided by The Radautz Vital Records Index Database 1857-1929 can jumpstart your research project. Please check it out and let us have your comments…!

bukovina.records@gmail.com

Our thanks go to Martina Lelgemann, who took care of the transcription, and to Bruce Reisch, who developed The Radautz Marriages search engine and website. Lucas Reisch provided php search engine expertise.

JNAV Heatid Czernowitz

Hi all, i am currently worlking on a Research paper on Czernowitz Jewish academic fraternities. With “Hasmonäa”, founded 1891 by members of the Viennese “Kadimah”, this new type of Jewish academic fraternity appeared in Czernowitz and found successors throughout the German-speaking Universities. The Jewish academic fraternities were modeled after the traditional type of “Studentenverbindung”, that existed in Czernowitz from 1875-1938/40. The members of the various “frats” distinguished themselves by wearing ribbons and caps showing the club colors of their fraternity. In the Romanian period the University organisation was changed to the “college System” and members of the fraternities were issued membership cards. here i have got one issued by JNAV “Heatid” for Josef Stark in 1922. “Heatid” came into being in 1918/19 and existed until 1936. Its club colors used to be green-silver-black shown in the ribbons with white caps. Any further information on “Heatid”, Josef Stark or any of the Czernowitz fraternities – especially photographs – would be highly appreciated. Thank You!Heatid_Cz0001

Death Certificates Issued by the Czernowitz Jewish Hospital for the Year 1915

http://hauster.de/data/DeathCertificatesIndex.pdf
http://hauster.de/data/DeathCertificatesP.pdf
https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resid=68987ECBE0F5AAFC!36965&authkey=!APjY6IZK26Ojg8Q&ithint=folder%2cjpg

Excerpt from the article “On the history of the Jews in Czernowitz” by Prof. Dr. Herman Sternberg: “During the war years, Czernowitz could hardly be recognized. People frightened and weighed down with troubles, hurried like shadows through the streets. Military uniforms dominated the cityscape. Officers and tired soldiers were on their way to or from the railroad station. The station building, heated in winter had become a dormitory. Soldiers slept on the floor pressed closely together, leaving no space free. Anyone seeking the entrance had to step over them. The closer the war came to its end, the greater became the lack of food and other necessities. The most difficult articles to obtain were fuel and foot wear. Prices rose from day to day. The greatly reduced Jewish population suffered indescribable difficulties. Intellectual life had died completely. After the fall of darkness, all traffic ceased because the street lights didn’t work. Families generally restricted themselves to one room, dimly lit with an oil lamp. The only topic of conversation was the war and its consequences.”

Courtesy: Jewish Genealogical Society Of Ottawa

Lehmann Online

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One of the major digitization projects for the Vienna City Library, located on the 1st floor of the Vienna City Hall since the building’s completion in 1883, covers Lehmann’s Address Books for Vienna between 1859-1942. Once the project has been completed in 2011, about 200,000 pages became available for researchers. Keeping in mind that many Czernowitzers escaped to Vienna during WW1, this online database is an important resource both for genealogists and historians focussed on Bukovina. Click on the logo below in order to research the annual volumes between 1859-1942!

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You don’t need to read German for your research. Look (1.) for the period of time. Scroll down (2.) to the requested year. Check (3.) the volume(s) displayed for the subsection “Namenverzeichnis” [catalogue of names] and refine your search accordingly. Enjoy (4.) the results of your research!

Mechel (Michael) Fleischer, 1842 – 1908, Men’s Tailor in Czernowitz

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Bukowinaer Post, October 20, 1908, p. 3

Edgar Hauster: This is the obituary for my great-grandfather Mechel (Michael) Fleischer, deceased on October 16, 1908 in Czernowitz, subsequently to a diabetic coma. He was the co-founder of the Men’s Tailor Store Binderer & Fleischer as early as 1858. In 1881 Mechel became sole owner of the well-established business on Herrengasse; his customers came mainly from the middle class and the civil service. Mechel’s colleagues from the Tailor’s Association carried him to his grave while his family was in mourning for him, i. e. his wife [Fanny Fleischer, née Ehrlich], his son [Emil Fleischer, Deputy Station Master in Czernowitz] and his two daughters, the first one [Gusta Bardach] married with the postmaster Bardach in Stanislau and the other one [Marjem Hauster, my grandmother] with the engineer Hauslich [correct, Elias Hauster, my grandfather] in Czernowitz.

From “Brotman” to “Brutmann” and from the 20th Century back to the 18th!

Under the headline “Discovering my 99% family” the Jewish Independent, Friday 04th, December 2015 edition, is publishing an outstanding article by Shula Klinger, author, illustrator and journalist living in North Vancouver. Shula is describing her success story researching her family history by becoming connected with Cyril Leonoff. Both Shula and Cyril are related to Betty Brotman, or more precisely Betti Brutmann, as per Shula’s grandmother’s birth certificate from Czernowitz in 1902. Shula writes: “… my older son asked me again. ‘Is he a relation? Is he ours?’ I told him, ‘Very possibly.’ And, again, he wanted to know the percentage probability. ‘Ninety-nine percent, then,’ Benjamin decided.” Since “Brotman” was initially “Brutmann”, as has been proven by the metrical records, why not going back to Bukovina as early as at the end of the 19th century, looking for the first Brutmanns, who setteled there? The register for “Jewish Taxpayers in Bukovina the the End of 18th Century” provides evidence:

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Around 1798 there were just two Jewish families in Onut [Pereunegru/Paraul-Negru], 25 mi north of Czernowitz, namely the Liedermads and the Brutmanns. The farmer Juda Brutmann and his wife Demuth [“Devotion”, sic!], née Salomon, had two daughters, Esther and Susanna. While Esther, born April 25th, 1795, deceased at the age of 2½, Susanna, born October 1oth, 1798, survived.

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Click to enlarge!

If, by any chance, Benjamin is going to ask me “Are we 100% for sure, for sure somehow related to the Brutmanns from Onut, Edgar? Or just 99%, do you think?” I’d say in reply: Benjamin, I don’t know exactly (yet), but for sure not very much less than 99%.” Shula, Benjamin’s mother, keeps following her family roots and with respect to our group she writes: “I have also found a home at Czernowitz-L, an email group hosted by Cornell University for people whose families come from what is now the Ukrainian city of Chernivtsi. Once known as ‘Jerusalem on the Prut,’ Czernowitz – as it is still called by those who recall its Habsburg past – was once home to 50,000 Jews. Less than a third of this number survived the war. Like many third-generation Czernowitzers, I write messages to Czernowitz-L in the hope that someone, somewhere, will remember hearing my family name and be able to point me in the direction of a lost relative. Very often, we hear nothing, but once in a blue moon, we strike gold.”