Category Archives: Documents

Storojinets Ghetto in August 1941

 

Inhabitants of the Storojinets Ghetto in August 1941

Naftali Zloczower, Kibbutz Kfar Charuv, Israel

In September 2017, my wife, Nava, and I made a roots trip to Bukovina, including Storojinets (Storozynets), the hometown of my parents and grandparents. The trip was enlightening, exciting, moving and inspiring. One of the top highlights of the trip was our visit in the Czernowitz Archives (State Archives of Chernivtsi Oblast). We were presented with cardboard files containing listings of the inhabitants of the Storojinet Ghetto in August of 1941, shortly after the Jewish Ghetto was established by the Romanian fascists in July, and shortly before all these Jewish residents were marched and hauled to the camps of Transnistria in October-November. We had very limited time to go over the many pages of listings, since we arrived close to the closing hour of the archives. Even though we were allowed to stay a little longer than the official closing time, we were under pressure and were not able to view all the lists (at the last minute they brought to us the files from my great grandparents’ village, Banila, but we did not have the time to even open the files). As we quickly went over the files, looking for familiar names, we found the names of almost all my relatives who were in the Ghetto at that time. Using my camera, I photographed only pages containing last names that looked familiar to me (relatives and family acquaintances). Even though the pages I photographed included only part of the many pages of listings, they contained many names of Ghetto residents.

I decided to compile and prepare a printed list of the residents appearing in the photographed pages, not realizing what a difficult task I took on myself. The lists were hand-written by different clerks, each with his/her personal handwriting. The language of the listings was Romanian, and some of the scripts were unfamiliar to me. Not being a doctor or a teacher, who are used to reading barely legible or illegible scribblings, it was very difficult for me to decipher many of the names and words. Street names and names of towns changed since 1941, so it is difficult to check these out. There were different spellings to the same names, making it even more difficult to decipher them. To add to the difficulties, some of the photographed pages were not in perfect focus, making the names even more illegible. It was extremely difficult to decipher the names of people, streets, towns, and regions, but I used different means and methods in trying to accomplish this. I think I was successful in deciphering many of the illegible names, but I am sure there are still many mistakes in the list I compiled. The city of Storojinet, the second largest in Bukovina in 1941, was and still is the administrative center of the County of Storojinet. The original lists give the names of the town/city and county or region where each of the listed people was born. In my lists, for people born in towns in Storojinet County, I just wrote the name of the town. For people born in towns/cities not in Storojinet County, I wrote the name of the town/city and, in parenthesis, the name of the county or region where they were born. The original lists showed the age of each person, and I added to the age the calculatedapproximate year of birth (1941 – age = year of birth). I also marked known relatives and family acquaintances. In this document, I include a photographed copy of one of the original pages, as a sample page, and translations of the Romanian column headings of the original table. If you wish to have a copy of an original page containing specific names, please write to me and I will send you a copy.

Read more: http://www.eylonconsulting.com/bukovina/blog/?p=2838

Dr. Jolie Weininger from Jerusalem wrote on August 7, 2019: “Yesterday morning checking my e-mail I saw the post about Storojinetz Ghetto in August 1941. When watching on Naftali Zloczower’s blog the part of the list of the inhabitants of the Ghetto where his family members were shown under a magnifying glass, below I suddenly saw the name of my Paternal Grand-Father : Neuman recte Weininger Nechemia! Thereafter looking at the whole page there were also the name of Bertha and Rachmiel Rosenberg, my Father’s aunt and uncle and lower on the same page my Maternal Grand-Father, David Hernes. What a strange coincidence! My Paternal Grand- Parents both perished in Bershad…on February ’42 my Father got a little note ( I still have it) where they asked for help. Money as they were starving, freezing and suffering of typhus…My parents got the Popovici permit to remain in Czernowitz – my Dad as a chemist, my Mom gaving birth to me : the first baby born in the Ghetto! Unfortunatelly when they tried to add the Grand-parents on the permits it was to late, they already left for Transnistria! My Father however could add his sister, Lola, which fortunately was in Czernowitz! My other Grand-father, David Hernes, could escape from the Storojinetz Ghetto. Walking to Czernowitz he was so seriously beaten up by roumenian soldiers, that after however arriving to join us in the Ghetto, he passed away in February ’42. Aunt Bertha and her husband survived Bershad. I was profoundly touched by Naftali Zloczower’s post, this is a modest way to show my appreciation and to thank him.”

1941 Siberia Deportation List – Mayer Ebner

From Zlila Ebner- Helman:

I have send a copy of a part of  the archive of my Grandfather Dr. Mayer Ebner and my Father Dr. Josef Ebner to the museum of Czernowitz (attached example[s]). a lot of Documents & old Photos & Articles etc… between 1899 – 1940 – besides those of 1940-1955.

The  document [below] was an urgent  request  of M. Ebner  to Nahum Goldman and Stefan Whise  to save the deported people to SIBERIA

More examples from Archive of M.Ebner

8 June 1930 – Senator Ebner speech at Rumanian Parliament

1926-7 Ebner the Head of Jewish Community in Czernowitz.

For more on Mayer Ebner (photos and documents) see our website:

http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/czernowitz8/ebner/MEbner.html

Thank you!

Zlila Ebner-Helman

 

 

 

 

The Radautz Vital Records Index Database 1857 – 1929

During the summer of 2016, I traveled to Rădăuţi, Romania, and visited the Archives in the Town Hall. After some negotiations and with a little bit of luck, I was given permission to photograph Jewish vital records for the Rădăuţi, Solca, and Vicov communities of Bukovina; see my blog posting “Books of Seven Seals in Rădăuți and Suceava”. The first database resulting from these efforts is The Radautz Marriage Index Database.

http://www.reisch-family.net/SevenSealsLukePHP/SevenSealsMarriages.html

Every society enlarges itself through marriages. When you are tracing your family history, this information can offer one of the most common missing links – a maiden name. All marriage records include the full names of the bride and groom as well as  the marriage date and other additional information, such as the names and birthplaces of each individual’s parents. As part ONE of an ongoing project – birth & death records will come soon – The Radautz Marriage Index Database is a rich web resource for Jewish heritage in Bukovina. It contains over 3,000 properly indexed marriage records for the period 1870-1929. Copies of family marriage records are freely available upon request.

http://www.reisch-family.net/SevenSealsRadautzDeathIndex/SearchForm.html

NEW: Even if final, but not trivial at all, death records are among the most important of all vital records. Death Indices typically contain the birth date of a person, date of death, cause of death and other details that are helpful in genealogical and historical research. As part TWO of our ongoing project, The Radautz Death Index Database is a rich web resource for Jewish heritage in Bukovina. It contains over 7,500 properly indexed death records for the period 1857-1929; some data refer back to births as early as the middle of the 18th century. Copies of family death records are freely available upon request.

Whether you are looking for an ancestor or trying to find a lost classmate, these records can provide a link to vital information and point you toward important clues. The free search provided by The Radautz Vital Records Index Database 1857-1929 can jumpstart your research project. Please check it out and let us have your comments…!

bukovina.records@gmail.com

Our thanks go to Martina Lelgemann, who took care of the transcription, and to Bruce Reisch, who developed The Radautz Marriages search engine and website. Lucas Reisch provided php search engine expertise.

JNAV Heatid Czernowitz

Hi all, i am currently worlking on a Research paper on Czernowitz Jewish academic fraternities. With “Hasmonäa”, founded 1891 by members of the Viennese “Kadimah”, this new type of Jewish academic fraternity appeared in Czernowitz and found successors throughout the German-speaking Universities. The Jewish academic fraternities were modeled after the traditional type of “Studentenverbindung”, that existed in Czernowitz from 1875-1938/40. The members of the various “frats” distinguished themselves by wearing ribbons and caps showing the club colors of their fraternity. In the Romanian period the University organisation was changed to the “college System” and members of the fraternities were issued membership cards. here i have got one issued by JNAV “Heatid” for Josef Stark in 1922. “Heatid” came into being in 1918/19 and existed until 1936. Its club colors used to be green-silver-black shown in the ribbons with white caps. Any further information on “Heatid”, Josef Stark or any of the Czernowitz fraternities – especially photographs – would be highly appreciated. Thank You!Heatid_Cz0001

Death Certificates Issued by the Czernowitz Jewish Hospital for the Year 1915

http://hauster.de/data/DeathCertificatesIndex.pdf
http://hauster.de/data/DeathCertificatesP.pdf
https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resid=68987ECBE0F5AAFC!36965&authkey=!APjY6IZK26Ojg8Q&ithint=folder%2cjpg

Excerpt from the article “On the history of the Jews in Czernowitz” by Prof. Dr. Herman Sternberg: “During the war years, Czernowitz could hardly be recognized. People frightened and weighed down with troubles, hurried like shadows through the streets. Military uniforms dominated the cityscape. Officers and tired soldiers were on their way to or from the railroad station. The station building, heated in winter had become a dormitory. Soldiers slept on the floor pressed closely together, leaving no space free. Anyone seeking the entrance had to step over them. The closer the war came to its end, the greater became the lack of food and other necessities. The most difficult articles to obtain were fuel and foot wear. Prices rose from day to day. The greatly reduced Jewish population suffered indescribable difficulties. Intellectual life had died completely. After the fall of darkness, all traffic ceased because the street lights didn’t work. Families generally restricted themselves to one room, dimly lit with an oil lamp. The only topic of conversation was the war and its consequences.”

Courtesy: Jewish Genealogical Society Of Ottawa

Lehmann Online

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One of the major digitization projects for the Vienna City Library, located on the 1st floor of the Vienna City Hall since the building’s completion in 1883, covers Lehmann’s Address Books for Vienna between 1859-1942. Once the project has been completed in 2011, about 200,000 pages became available for researchers. Keeping in mind that many Czernowitzers escaped to Vienna during WW1, this online database is an important resource both for genealogists and historians focussed on Bukovina. Click on the logo below in order to research the annual volumes between 1859-1942!

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You don’t need to read German for your research. Look (1.) for the period of time. Scroll down (2.) to the requested year. Check (3.) the volume(s) displayed for the subsection “Namenverzeichnis” [catalogue of names] and refine your search accordingly. Enjoy (4.) the results of your research!