Category Archives: Bukovina

Storojinets Ghetto in August 1941

 

Inhabitants of the Storojinets Ghetto in August 1941

Naftali Zloczower, Kibbutz Kfar Charuv, Israel

In September 2017, my wife, Nava, and I made a roots trip to Bukovina, including Storojinets (Storozynets), the hometown of my parents and grandparents. The trip was enlightening, exciting, moving and inspiring. One of the top highlights of the trip was our visit in the Czernowitz Archives (State Archives of Chernivtsi Oblast). We were presented with cardboard files containing listings of the inhabitants of the Storojinet Ghetto in August of 1941, shortly after the Jewish Ghetto was established by the Romanian fascists in July, and shortly before all these Jewish residents were marched and hauled to the camps of Transnistria in October-November. We had very limited time to go over the many pages of listings, since we arrived close to the closing hour of the archives. Even though we were allowed to stay a little longer than the official closing time, we were under pressure and were not able to view all the lists (at the last minute they brought to us the files from my great grandparents’ village, Banila, but we did not have the time to even open the files). As we quickly went over the files, looking for familiar names, we found the names of almost all my relatives who were in the Ghetto at that time. Using my camera, I photographed only pages containing last names that looked familiar to me (relatives and family acquaintances). Even though the pages I photographed included only part of the many pages of listings, they contained many names of Ghetto residents.

I decided to compile and prepare a printed list of the residents appearing in the photographed pages, not realizing what a difficult task I took on myself. The lists were hand-written by different clerks, each with his/her personal handwriting. The language of the listings was Romanian, and some of the scripts were unfamiliar to me. Not being a doctor or a teacher, who are used to reading barely legible or illegible scribblings, it was very difficult for me to decipher many of the names and words. Street names and names of towns changed since 1941, so it is difficult to check these out. There were different spellings to the same names, making it even more difficult to decipher them. To add to the difficulties, some of the photographed pages were not in perfect focus, making the names even more illegible. It was extremely difficult to decipher the names of people, streets, towns, and regions, but I used different means and methods in trying to accomplish this. I think I was successful in deciphering many of the illegible names, but I am sure there are still many mistakes in the list I compiled. The city of Storojinet, the second largest in Bukovina in 1941, was and still is the administrative center of the County of Storojinet. The original lists give the names of the town/city and county or region where each of the listed people was born. In my lists, for people born in towns in Storojinet County, I just wrote the name of the town. For people born in towns/cities not in Storojinet County, I wrote the name of the town/city and, in parenthesis, the name of the county or region where they were born. The original lists showed the age of each person, and I added to the age the calculatedapproximate year of birth (1941 – age = year of birth). I also marked known relatives and family acquaintances. In this document, I include a photographed copy of one of the original pages, as a sample page, and translations of the Romanian column headings of the original table. If you wish to have a copy of an original page containing specific names, please write to me and I will send you a copy.

Read more: http://www.eylonconsulting.com/bukovina/blog/?p=2838

Dr. Jolie Weininger from Jerusalem wrote on August 7, 2019: “Yesterday morning checking my e-mail I saw the post about Storojinetz Ghetto in August 1941. When watching on Naftali Zloczower’s blog the part of the list of the inhabitants of the Ghetto where his family members were shown under a magnifying glass, below I suddenly saw the name of my Paternal Grand-Father : Neuman recte Weininger Nechemia! Thereafter looking at the whole page there were also the name of Bertha and Rachmiel Rosenberg, my Father’s aunt and uncle and lower on the same page my Maternal Grand-Father, David Hernes. What a strange coincidence! My Paternal Grand- Parents both perished in Bershad…on February ’42 my Father got a little note ( I still have it) where they asked for help. Money as they were starving, freezing and suffering of typhus…My parents got the Popovici permit to remain in Czernowitz – my Dad as a chemist, my Mom gaving birth to me : the first baby born in the Ghetto! Unfortunatelly when they tried to add the Grand-parents on the permits it was to late, they already left for Transnistria! My Father however could add his sister, Lola, which fortunately was in Czernowitz! My other Grand-father, David Hernes, could escape from the Storojinetz Ghetto. Walking to Czernowitz he was so seriously beaten up by roumenian soldiers, that after however arriving to join us in the Ghetto, he passed away in February ’42. Aunt Bertha and her husband survived Bershad. I was profoundly touched by Naftali Zloczower’s post, this is a modest way to show my appreciation and to thank him.”

The Initial Spark to Jägendorf’s Foundry

Yitzhak Arad, The Holocaust in the Soviet Union, University of Nebraska Press & Yad Vashem, Lincoln/Jerusalem, 2009, P. 301-3012: “Around 27,000 Jews – half of the deportees from Bukovina – were concentrated in the Mogilev-Podolsky region. The town was an economical center, and many of the deportees hoped to find accomodation and employment there. The initiative of a few Jews made it possible for thousands of deportees to remain in the town – contrary to the designs of the Romanian authorities, who felt that there was no room in the semi-ruined town for the Jews. A prominent figure among these was the engineer Ziegfried Jägendorf, who had held the rank of lieutenant in the Austrian army during World War I. Jägendorf managed to arrange a meeting with the town’s Romanian prefect, Colonel Ion Baleanu, with whom he had served in the Austrian army and who knew that he was an engineer. To Jägendorf’s request that conditions should be eased for the Jewish deportees and that they should be permitted to stay in the town, Baleanu replied:

You must realize that Jews cannot stay in Mogilev: we are establishing camps for them elsewhere in the district…We need your services here in Mogilev. The power station was put out of action during the battles and further damaged when the Dnestr overflowed its banks. I want you to select a few electricians and mechanics from your ranks, four or five, perhaps.

Jägendorf convinced the town’s Romanian authorities that the repair and reopening of the power station would require hundreds of Jewish workers, and so they were permitted to remain in the town with their families. After Jägendorf and his employees reinstated the town’s electricity supply, further manufacturing plants were established in which Jews were employed. One of Jägendorf’s enterprises was a metal foundry, to which he gave the name ‘Turnatoria’. It produced various commodities, including heaters for government officials and the local population, metal parts for repairing bridges over the Dnestr, and other objects; in the beginning of 1942 more than 1,000 Jews were employed in these plants. For the deportees these initiatives were salvation. Jägendorf was elected chairman of the thirteen-man Jewish council, and, except for the latter half of 1942, he served in this position for as long as the ghetto existed.”

Read aslo: https://hauster.blogspot.com/2010/02/das-wunder-von-moghilev.html

From Leah Rosenberg

 

My name is Leah Rosenberg and I live in Israel. I am the daughter of Luba (Nissenbaum) Rosenberg and Jonah Rosenberg. My grandfather David Nissenbaum owned one of the textile factories in Czernowitz before confiscation by the Nazis. I do not know the name, but so I was told by my mother. My mother’s sister, Sala Weinblum and my uncle Shlomo Weinblum was a partner of the original ownership of Trinaco before the war. My family in Czernowitz survived due to employment and their managerial positions in the factory/factories. The other members of my family were Pola and Yosef Lehr, Jacob and Regina and their young child Yitzchak. Sala and Shlomo Weinblum also had a young child Ami who now resides in the US by the name of Abraham Enav and is a member of your Blog.

I am searching for more information to piece together an accurate account of my family’s life during the holocaust and also to share it with the archives at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem.

From left to right: Pola Lehr, Regina Nissenbaum, Ami Weinblum (aka Abraham Enav), Sala Weinblum, Luba Rosenberg (My Mother)

My Father, Jonah Rosenberg

 

The Aron Kodesh in the Siret Synagogue • A Criminal Case

Below are the links to the full story:

https://jewish-heritage-europe.eu/2019/02/11/romania-ark-of-historic-synagogue-dismantled/

https://jewish-heritage-europe.eu/2019/02/13/update-comparative-photos-siret-ark-and-replica/

http://cja.huji.ac.il/browser.php?mode=set&id=24254

http://moreshet-auctions.com/the-beautiful-aron-kodesh-of-the-great-synagogue-of-siret-in-romaniabeginning-of-the-19th-century-a-museum-worthy-item-of-extreme-historic-value


Romanian Press Coverage (Selection):
https://goo.gl/Fnx14o
https://goo.gl/H3ESY2
https://goo.gl/uDQ6rP

“Jewish Life in Radautz Before, During and After the Holocaust” Cont’d!

ADDITIONAL LINKS

Book of the Month, 10/2017: Lost Childhood • Verlorene Kindheit • Copilărie pierdută
Ehpes Blog, 07/2017: Jewish Life in Radautz Before, During and After the Holocaust
Suceava News, 24-Jun-2018: Întâlnire cu o supraviețuitoare a Holocaustului