Category Archives: Memoirs

An Atmosphere of Hope and Confidence

Eine Atmosphäre von Hoffnung und Zuversicht • An Atmosphere of Hope and Confidence
Hilfe für verfolgte Juden in Rumänien, Transnistrien und Nordsiebenbürgen 1940-1944 •
Aid for Persecuted Jews in Romania, Transnistria and Northern Transylvania 1940-1944
296 pages, 170 x 240 mm, with numerous illustrations, hardcover, numerous partly colored illustrations September 2020 ISBN 978-3-86732-348-2 Lukas Verlag

During the Second World War, Romania was an ally of the German Reich. The spectrum of persecution of Jews in the Romanian territory was broad. It ranged from legislative measures to deprivation of rights and expropriation to pogroms, deportations, and mass murder. 
However, individual courageous individuals from various social strata came to the aid of the oppressed people. This book presents these often anonymous helpers who put their lives at risk for the first time to German readers. At the end of June 1941, for example, the twenty-one year old factory worker Elisabeta Nicopoi from Jassy hid several Jewish neighbors who thus escaped the pogrom. Since early 1943, staff members of the Romanian Red Cross had been bringing medicines collected in Bucharest to the hard-to-reach ghettos in the Romanian occupied territory of Transnistria in southern Ukraine. In the same year, financial aid from foreign Jewish organizations also reached the helper networks. Even while the Romanian army was still fighting alongside the Wehrmacht, Jewish survivors from Romania were able to emigrate by ship via Turkey to Palestine from 1944, among them many orphans. Only later were helpers honored. Many of them were imprisoned in communist prisons; only a few survived.

Gottes Mühlen in Berlin • Mills of God in Berlin
Ausgewählte Gedichte • Selected Poems
Herausgegeben und kommentiert von Andrei Corbea-Hoisie •
Published and Commented by Andrei Corbea-Hoisie

156 pages, paperback, 2020 ISBN 978-3-89086-393-1 Rimbaud Verlag

The present edition intends to reconstruct the book project entitled “Gottes Mühlen in Berlin” by Immanuel Weissglas, whose publication was stopped in Bucharest in 1947 for unclear reasons – be they political or economic – and never appeared again in the planned design. In the course of time, only individual poems were selected for publication; Weissglas himself revised numerous texts into new versions and incorporated them into the volume of poetry “Der Nobiskrug” (1972).

Leben und Tod in der Epoche des Holocaust in der Ukraine •
Life and Death in the Era of the Holocaust in Ukraine
Zeugnisse von Überlebenden • Testimonies of Survivors
December 2019 ISBN: 978-3-86331-475-0 Pages: 1152 METROPOL

For decades, the Holocaust in Ukraine received little attention. It is only since the 1990s that German crimes have increasingly attracted the interest of historians and the public, both in Germany and in Ukraine itself. Nevertheless, there is still little knowledge of what happened in the former Soviet Socialist Republic. The historian Boris Zabarko, himself a survivor of the Shargorod ghetto, was one of the first to systematically research the fate of Jews under German occupation in Ukraine. For more than 20 years he has been collecting survivors’ reports and interviewing those who were once persecuted. In 1999, a first publication in Russian appeared, followed by a multi-volume work. The present edition contains more than 180 reports of survivors. They are assigned to the respective crime scenes, for which introductory contextual information is given, and follow the chronology of the occupation. The result is a “Geography of the Holocaust” in the Ukraine.

Unser Überlebenswill war stark • Our Will To Survive Was Strong
Gespräche mit M. Bartfeld-Feller über Czernowitz, die sibirische Verbannung und Israel •
Discussions with M. Bartfeld-Feller about Czernowitz, the Siberian Banishment and Israel
1st edition 2020, 68 pages, ISBN 978-3-86628-678-8 Hartung-Gorre Verlag

1. Erhard Roy Wiehn: From Czernowitz through Siberia to Israel – Tel Aviv 1996
2. Christel Wollmann-Fiedler: 50 Years of Siberian Exile – Tel Aviv 2012

Todefuge Gedichte und Prosa 1952-1967 • Deathfugue Poems and Prose 1952-1967
Audio Book CD, 2 CDs, running time: 1h 59min ISBN: 978-3-8445-3919-6
Published on September 14, 2020 Random House

Paul Celan: One of the most important German-language poets in original language. His poetry is world literature full of musicality and form, which puts the utmost of human experience into words. Paul Celan was famous for the very special way he recited his poems. Between his scandalous reading in 1952 in front of Gruppe 47 and his death as a celebrated poet, there are almost two decades in which Celan presented his poems in numerous radio and public readings and gradually changed his style. In this new compilation, these original recordings can be heard for the first time.

Forgotten Holocaust – A Journey to Transnistria

The Chernivtsi Museum of the History and Culture of Bukovinian Jews: „The official trailer of a documentary ‘Forgotten Holocaust – a journey to Transnistria’ (film director: Resa Asarschahab, Idea: Markus Winkler und Kristina Forbat) has been aired. The film was shot in the autumn of 2019 in the framework of a Ukrainian-German educational project. The project was initiated by the Institute for the German Culture and History of Southeast Europe at the Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich (https://www.ikgs.de) and implemented in cooperation with the Chernivtsi Museum of the History and Culture of Bukovinian Jews, Yurii Fedkovych Chernivtsi National University and the State University of the Republic of Moldova (Chisinau).

The film describes the life of a Chernivtsi citizen Rosa Zuckermann, who was deported to Transnistria in the autumn of 1941 together with her parents, a husband and a small child. Rosa was the only one of the whole family who survived. The story of this family resembles the fate of many Jewish families from Chernivtsi. That is why it is so meaningful and important to get to know it.

Film crew from Germany made the journey from Chernivtsi through Măşrculeşti, Soroca, Mohyliv-Podilskyi to a small town in Podillia – Bershad. It was accompanied by Dr. Markus Winkler (Berlin), the head of the project; Mykola Kushnir, the director of the Museum of the History and Culture of Bukovinian Jews (Chernivtsi) as well as by students from Ukraine (Chernivtsi, Mohyliv-Podilskyi) and the Republic of Moldova (Chisinau, Bălți).

Felix Zuckermann, the son of Rosa Zuckermann, also took part in the project. For him it was a moving trip into the terrible past, searching for traces and answers to questions he hadn’t dare to ask his mom when she was still alive.

Students, who participated in the project, were able to learn more about the Holocaust in Transnistria. During the seminar ‘Memory Workshop’ they discussed issues related to the culture of remembrance in their countries as well as presented their projects in this field.

Official presentation of the film was to be held at the end of February in Berlin. However due to the coronavirus pandemic it has been postponed.”

Stones to Czernowitz • A Documentary in Progress

This is the story of a woman, Ilana, who’s passion was to find out what happened to her Grandfather after WWII. His name was Gustav Gedaly. He and his wife and daughter (Ilana’s mother) were rescued from the Holocaust thanks to the actions of a righteous gentile. However, after the War, Gustav was deported to Siberia by Stalin, never to be seen by his family again. Ilana promised her mother that she would find out why…

Read more at: https://www.stonestoczernowitz.com

1941 Siberia Deportation List – Mayer Ebner

From Zlila Ebner- Helman:

I have send a copy of a part of  the archive of my Grandfather Dr. Mayer Ebner and my Father Dr. Josef Ebner to the museum of Czernowitz (attached example[s]). a lot of Documents & old Photos & Articles etc… between 1899 – 1940 – besides those of 1940-1955.

The  document [below] was an urgent  request  of M. Ebner  to Nahum Goldman and Stefan Whise  to save the deported people to SIBERIA

More examples from Archive of M.Ebner

8 June 1930 – Senator Ebner speech at Rumanian Parliament

1926-7 Ebner the Head of Jewish Community in Czernowitz.

For more on Mayer Ebner (photos and documents) see our website:

http://czernowitz.ehpes.com/czernowitz8/ebner/MEbner.html

Thank you!

Zlila Ebner-Helman

 

 

 

 

Sally Rosenberg Rendall Interview

Henry Rendall: I’m the son of two Czernowitz parents, Carol (Carl) Rendall (Rendel) and Sally (Rosenberg) Rendall. I am also a silent follower of the site since my dad passed away in September 2009. My dear sweet mother Sally, a survivor of 3 years in Transnistria, sadly passed away in Montreal, Quebec on Monday [10-Jun-2019] at the age of 97 1/2. She had many amazing stories about growing up in Romania in the 1920’s, 30’s and 40’s. I luckily interviewed her about 8 years ago and I don’t think she would have minded me sharing it with you. She was a special woman and wonderful mother, with 8 grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren, all who she absolutely adored and vice versa. She will be greatly missed.

Glimpses of Youth Activities in Pre-War Bucovina

The Orchestra and Choir of the Aron Pumnul Liceum, conducted by Prof. Sava Arbore, in April 1940, prior to departure to Bucharest for a live performance at Radio Bucuresti. Prof. Alfred Schneider: “I am the second accordion player from the left; The cello player in the front was known to us as Burschi Schwefel, you met him as Radu Armsa, a retired high official and diplomat in post WWII Romania; the student in the right corner of the last row was the son of the Mayor of Czernowitz Marmeliuc; there were several Jewish students in this picture, notably the first violinist at the left in the first row.”

The Marching Band of the Aron Pumnul Liceum. Prof. Alfred Schneider: “The date of the parade on the Siebenbuergerstrasse was June 8,1940, on the birthday of King Carol II. I am the first accordion player on the right. Three weeks later, soldiers of the Red Army were marching there and singing ‘Moskwa moya…’. Later in October I marched there with my school carrying banners hailing the great Stalin before a reviewing stand on which stood an honorary group of German SS soldiers, in Czernowitz to supervise the ‘repatriation’ of the Volksdeutschen.”

Four Jewish strajeri (successor organization to the Boy Scouts) at the public school in Wiznitz. Prof. Alfred Schneider: “The photo was taken in 1936, we were in third grade of Public Elementary School in Wiznitz. I am standing, the three other boys who survived Transnistria were Bertl Koller (left) and Baruch Winter (right), both later lived in Israel, Erwin Rosner (front) lived in Chile (?). The photo caused an international incident*: when my uncle in New York received it he was very upset, promptly returned it noting that his nephew giving the Hitler salute is an insult! He must have forgiven me, because in 1948 he sponsored my immigration to the U.S.”
[*The raised right hand (Roman) salute was certainly not a traditional Romanian Boy Scout salute. The Romanian Scouts (cercetasi), abolished in 1935, used the international three-finger salute. King Carol II, trying to counteract the growing fascist movement, started to change from a constitutional to an authoritarian rule. In 1938, all political parties were abolished and replaced by the Front of National Renaissance (Frontul Renasterii Nationala) and the Straja Tarii youth organization became an integral part of the Front. The spoken salute accompanying the raised right hand was “sanatate”, which translates to Gesundheit or Heil in German.The similarity with the Hitler salute was not accidental.]

Courtesy: Prof. Alfred Schneider, Professor Emeritus of Nuclear Engineering Georgia Tech and MIT

Jewish Refugees in Shanghai (1938 – 1947)

The Shanghai Jewish Refugees Museum unveiled a memorial wall in 2014 listing the names of 13,732 Jews who found a haven in the Chinese city during World War II.

Sinosphere, the Blog of The New York Times, wrote on the dedication ceremony: “In the 1930s and 40s, thousands of Jews escaping Nazi Germany arrived in Shanghai, a place they could enter without a visa. After the Évian Conference of 1938, when the major powers shut their doors to nearly all Jewish immigrants, the city remained one of the few available places of refuge. By the beginning of World War II, more European Jews had fled to Shanghai than any other city in the world. The memorial consists of a 111-foot-long copper wall etched with the names and featuring a sculpture of six allegorical figures representing faith, suffering, love, determination, light and hope, designed by the Chinese artist He Ning. Chen Jian, the museum’s director, said the names on the memorial were compiled with the help of former Jewish refugees in Shanghai, as well as Chinese and foreign scholars, according to China Daily. Many of the names were taken from a list found in the German book ‘Exil Shanghai: 1938-1947,’ co-authored by Sonja Mühlberger, 75, who was herself born in Shanghai to refugee parents in the 1930s and has been involved in the memorial project.

The list in her book was first compiled during the war by three teenage Jewish girls hired by Japanese military officers to undertake an informal census. Most of the Jewish population then was relegated by the Japanese to an overcrowded district called Hongkou, a ‘designated area for stateless refugees.’ In a museum press release, Ms. Mühlberger comments, ‘My parents’ experiences in Shanghai were certainly not the easiest, but if they had not been exiled there, I wouldn’t even be alive today, let alone have the chance to tell this history.'”

Among these refugees, immortalized on the “Wall of Names”, we discover Rosa Koppelmann from Czernowitz, the addressee of the “Cry of Desperation from Siberia via Shanghai to Czernowitz”. Seven further names, potentially all related to Rosa, were listed under the same address in Shanghai, i. e. Zang Yang Lu Rd., former Ward Rd.:

HERBERT KOPPELKOWSKI • RUTH KOPPELKOWSKI • JULIUSZ KOPPELMAN • RICHARD KOPPELMANN • MAX KOPPLOWITZ • SIMON KOPSKI • MAX KOPSTEIN

“Jewish Life in Radautz Before, During and After the Holocaust” Cont’d!

ADDITIONAL LINKS

Book of the Month, 10/2017: Lost Childhood • Verlorene Kindheit • Copilărie pierdută
Ehpes Blog, 07/2017: Jewish Life in Radautz Before, During and After the Holocaust
Suceava News, 24-Jun-2018: Întâlnire cu o supraviețuitoare a Holocaustului

Remembering Emmanuel Landau, MD, PhD

Dr. Emmanuel Landau (Courtesy by Rob Gartenberg)

Rob Gartenberg: I will always remember my mother’s cousin Manny (as he called himself after settling in the USA) as a witty man with a generous spirit, a sparkle in his eye and a razor-sharp intellect. We always knew him as Mani, for he was born Manuel Leonid Landau, the initials of his name derived from those of his grandfather, Leibish Mendel Landau, a well-respected rabbi. Leibish’s wife, Ettl Schächte, once said of Manny as a boy:  “Das Kind hat kein Ernst in sich, er will nur spielen!” (The child has no earnestness, he just wants to play). Well, later in life he certainly did develop his serious side, becoming a widely respected professor and medical researcher. But it’s true, he never lost his appetite for laughter. His maternal grandfather was Josef Ohrenstein, who founded and ran the Jewish Hospital in Czernowitz.

Dr. Josef Ohrenstein (Courtesy by Rob Gartenberg)

After being interned in Transnistria, Manny, his parents and his maternal grandfather managed to get onto one of the last boats to Palestine, where people started calling him Emmanuel. This name found its way onto many personal documents, so, to avoid confusion he changed his name to Emmanuel Manuel and dropped the Leonid. His father, Jakob Landau was an eye doctor, his mother, Ida Ohrenstein, worked for a well-known publishing company. Sadly, Manny was not an eager correspondent, so our intermittent meetings were my only opportunity to benefit from his very extensive knowledge and wisdom. I never had a boring conversation with him and wish we’d lived closer together and that our paths had crossed more often. That, in itself, is a tribute to his character: he was someone you wanted to spend time with. My mother grew up with him in Czernowitz, where he lived in Herrengasse (she lived in Taboragasse), close to the old synagogue. Mani was like a younger brother to her and life was good until the Red Army marched in and many Jews had to flee (she among them, though they were later reunited in Palestine). Mani also had an eccentric side to him, accompanying every dinner with a lemon, cut into seven equal pieces, which he then ate. I cannot recall the significance of this, but it gives a small insight into his nature, showing that he liked to give life meaning. He married twice, having two children of whom he was very proud with his second wife, and his last decades were spent living with a third companion, first in New York, then in Atlanta. He is – and will remain – sorely missed by his family.

Click here for the obituary published by the Mount Sinai Alumni Relations Team!