Category Archives: Transnistria

The Initial Spark to Jägendorf’s Foundry

Yitzhak Arad, The Holocaust in the Soviet Union, University of Nebraska Press & Yad Vashem, Lincoln/Jerusalem, 2009, P. 301-3012: “Around 27,000 Jews – half of the deportees from Bukovina – were concentrated in the Mogilev-Podolsky region. The town was an economical center, and many of the deportees hoped to find accomodation and employment there. The initiative of a few Jews made it possible for thousands of deportees to remain in the town – contrary to the designs of the Romanian authorities, who felt that there was no room in the semi-ruined town for the Jews. A prominent figure among these was the engineer Ziegfried Jägendorf, who had held the rank of lieutenant in the Austrian army during World War I. Jägendorf managed to arrange a meeting with the town’s Romanian prefect, Colonel Ion Baleanu, with whom he had served in the Austrian army and who knew that he was an engineer. To Jägendorf’s request that conditions should be eased for the Jewish deportees and that they should be permitted to stay in the town, Baleanu replied:

You must realize that Jews cannot stay in Mogilev: we are establishing camps for them elsewhere in the district…We need your services here in Mogilev. The power station was put out of action during the battles and further damaged when the Dnestr overflowed its banks. I want you to select a few electricians and mechanics from your ranks, four or five, perhaps.

Jägendorf convinced the town’s Romanian authorities that the repair and reopening of the power station would require hundreds of Jewish workers, and so they were permitted to remain in the town with their families. After Jägendorf and his employees reinstated the town’s electricity supply, further manufacturing plants were established in which Jews were employed. One of Jägendorf’s enterprises was a metal foundry, to which he gave the name ‘Turnatoria’. It produced various commodities, including heaters for government officials and the local population, metal parts for repairing bridges over the Dnestr, and other objects; in the beginning of 1942 more than 1,000 Jews were employed in these plants. For the deportees these initiatives were salvation. Jägendorf was elected chairman of the thirteen-man Jewish council, and, except for the latter half of 1942, he served in this position for as long as the ghetto existed.”

Read aslo: https://hauster.blogspot.com/2010/02/das-wunder-von-moghilev.html

Sally Rosenberg Rendall Interview

Henry Rendall: I’m the son of two Czernowitz parents, Carol (Carl) Rendall (Rendel) and Sally (Rosenberg) Rendall. I am also a silent follower of the site since my dad passed away in September 2009. My dear sweet mother Sally, a survivor of 3 years in Transnistria, sadly passed away in Montreal, Quebec on Monday [10-Jun-2019] at the age of 97 1/2. She had many amazing stories about growing up in Romania in the 1920’s, 30’s and 40’s. I luckily interviewed her about 8 years ago and I don’t think she would have minded me sharing it with you. She was a special woman and wonderful mother, with 8 grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren, all who she absolutely adored and vice versa. She will be greatly missed.

“Jewish Life in Radautz Before, During and After the Holocaust” Cont’d!

ADDITIONAL LINKS

Book of the Month, 10/2017: Lost Childhood • Verlorene Kindheit • Copilărie pierdută
Ehpes Blog, 07/2017: Jewish Life in Radautz Before, During and After the Holocaust
Suceava News, 24-Jun-2018: Întâlnire cu o supraviețuitoare a Holocaustului

Ghetto List by ZRBG (German Social Security Ghetto Pension)

Holocaust survivors who voluntarily worked in a ghetto located in a territory occupied by or integrated into the German Reich may apply for two types of compensation payment: The Ghetto pension pursuant to ZRBG (German Social Security Ghetto Pension) and the Payment to victims of persecution in recognition of work in a ghetto. Please be aware that as of July 18, 2014, substantial changes to the Ghetto pension pursuant to ZRBG have been signed into law which are described below.

1. Ghetto pension pursuant to ZRBG (Law Regulating the Conditions for Pension Payments on the Basis of Employment in a Ghetto)

2. Payment to victims of persecution in recognition of work in a ghetto which did not constitute forced labor

The articles “Ghetto: Financial Compensation for voluntary Labor in a Ghetto” by the German Missions in the United States and “German Social Security Ghetto Pension – ZRBG” by the Claims Conference provide additional information.

Dr. Gali Tibon, Romania and the Holocaust



Gali Tibon is the founder and CEO of the Institute for excellence in the Humanities and the head of the educational board of the ‘Beit Lohamei Haghetaot’ Ghetto Fighters’ House Museum. From 2014–2015 she was a Postdoctoral Fellow, Sawyer Seminar Postdoctoral Fellowship, at Carnegie Mellon University, Department of History. Her Ph.D. dissertation: ‘The Jewish Leadership of the South Bukovina Communities in the Ghettos in the Mogilev Region in Transnistria, and its Dealings with the Romanian Regime (1941–1944)’ was completed at Tel Aviv University. She has completed an annotated edit of a diary from the Shargorod Ghetto in Transnistria. Tibon is a former high school principal in Bat – Yam and Ma’alot – Tarshicha and won the education prize of The ORT schools net for an outstanding school and its principal, lectures for principals, teachers and administrators from all sectors of Israeli society.

Gali Tibon is among the alumni of the “The Zvi Yavetz School of Historical Studies”. The School of Historical Studies is the center for academic activity in all fields of historical research at Tel Aviv University, and a leading institution for research in Israel and abroad.

ibidem: From summer 1941 onwards, Romania actively pursued at its own initiative the mass killing of Jews in the territories it controlled. 1941 saw 13,000 Jewish residents of the Romanian city of Ia‚i killed, the extermination of thousands of Jews in Northern Bukovina and Bessarabia by Romanian armed forces and local people, large-scale deportations of Jews to the camps and ghettos of Transnistria, and massacres in and around Odessa. Overall, more than 300,000 Jews of Romanian and Soviet or Ukrainian origin were murdered in Romanian- controlled territories during the Second World War. In this volume, a number of renowned experts shed light on the events, the contexts, and the aftermath of this under-researched and lesser-known dimension of the Holocaust. 75 years on, this book gives much-needed impetus to research on the Holocaust in Romania and Romanian-controlled territories [Table of Contents].

Beyond the Nistru • Documentary by Boris Maftsir














Ruth Films, Jerusalem: “On June 22, 1941 – The German and Romanian armies attack the USSR on the southern part of the front. The Romanians aimed to return to the Dniester River and regain control of Bessarabia and North Bukovina which were taken from them in the summer of 1940 by the Soviets. In late August 1941 the Germans grant the Romanian government the region on the east bank of the Dniester River, or as it is known in Romanian – Nistru. Hitler names this area – Transnistria. The film “Beyond the Nistru” depicts some of the Holocaust events that took place during the first year of the greatest patriotic war in Romanian occupied Soviet Union territories. The film enrolls the story of the suffering and death of hundreds of thousands of Jews – victims of the Holocaust perpetrated by the Romanians.”

Read more at:
http://www.ruthfilms.com/beyond-the-nistru.html

http://www.holocaustinussr.com/beyond-the-nistru-witnesses-en/

Women and World War II

CLICK ABOVE TO READ MORE

Rolle einiger Frauen bei der Rettung von Juden in Rumanien 1941-1945

HAUSLEITNER, Mariana

Abstract

Only a few historians in Romania who did research on the protectors of Jews, highlighted those protectors who were being honored in Yad Vashem. Especially the role of two women became somewhat better known. Viorica Agarici of the Romanian Red Cross got involved in the process of saving several Jews in 1941. The other woman who protested in 1942, when the Germans announced that Jews from Romania were to be deported to the camp Bełżec, was the mother of a young king Mihai called Elena.
To this date, no research has been conducted on the Romanian and Jewish women who got involved in the saving of over 5.000 orphaned children from the Romanian occupation territory Transnistria. Some publications informed about the autonomous Help-Commission at the Jewish Center. The article shows how a group of Jewish women collected garments and medication for the deported Jews from Romania in the camps of Transnistria. They closely cooperated with some Romanian women who distributed these goods through the channels of the Romanian Red Cross. After a long struggle in the spring of 1944, the first orphaned children were repatriated to Romania and were later brought to Palestine by ship in 1944/1945.