Category Archives: Education

Dr. Gali Tibon, Romania and the Holocaust



Gali Tibon is the founder and CEO of the Institute for excellence in the Humanities and the head of the educational board of the ‘Beit Lohamei Haghetaot’ Ghetto Fighters’ House Museum. From 2014–2015 she was a Postdoctoral Fellow, Sawyer Seminar Postdoctoral Fellowship, at Carnegie Mellon University, Department of History. Her Ph.D. dissertation: ‘The Jewish Leadership of the South Bukovina Communities in the Ghettos in the Mogilev Region in Transnistria, and its Dealings with the Romanian Regime (1941–1944)’ was completed at Tel Aviv University. She has completed an annotated edit of a diary from the Shargorod Ghetto in Transnistria. Tibon is a former high school principal in Bat – Yam and Ma’alot – Tarshicha and won the education prize of The ORT schools net for an outstanding school and its principal, lectures for principals, teachers and administrators from all sectors of Israeli society.

Gali Tibon is among the alumni of the “The Zvi Yavetz School of Historical Studies”. The School of Historical Studies is the center for academic activity in all fields of historical research at Tel Aviv University, and a leading institution for research in Israel and abroad.

ibidem: From summer 1941 onwards, Romania actively pursued at its own initiative the mass killing of Jews in the territories it controlled. 1941 saw 13,000 Jewish residents of the Romanian city of Ia‚i killed, the extermination of thousands of Jews in Northern Bukovina and Bessarabia by Romanian armed forces and local people, large-scale deportations of Jews to the camps and ghettos of Transnistria, and massacres in and around Odessa. Overall, more than 300,000 Jews of Romanian and Soviet or Ukrainian origin were murdered in Romanian- controlled territories during the Second World War. In this volume, a number of renowned experts shed light on the events, the contexts, and the aftermath of this under-researched and lesser-known dimension of the Holocaust. 75 years on, this book gives much-needed impetus to research on the Holocaust in Romania and Romanian-controlled territories [Table of Contents].

Jewish Life in Radautz Before, During and After the Holocaust

The working team “War Graves”, founded by Petra and Holger Klawitter at the European School Rövershagen implemented the project “Jewish Life in Radautz Before, During and After the Holocaust” in close cooperation with the Andronic Motrescu College from Rădăuți. On July 4, 2017 I had the privilege to meet Petra, Holger and a few of their pupils in Rövershagen close to the Hanseatic City of Rostock.

The outstanding gifted and dedicated couple, both of them history teachers at the European School Rövershagen, not only founded the working team itself but also erected the rewarded “Holocaust Memorial Railway Wagon” on the school campus. For the implementation of the ongoing project, in March 2017, a small advance team conducted interviews with Holocaust survivors from Rădăuți in Israel, such as Arthur Klinghoffer and Aron Ashkenazy and others. On July 6, 2017 the entire working team set forth on their journey (by bus) to Rădăuți.

In Rădăuți they joined their Romanian counterparts and the entrire working team – assisted by Bondy and Sidi Stenzler (rear row, 2nd and 3rd from left) set to work. Over the course of this very complex biennial project different suboperations will be effected, such as research works at the archives, interviews with the local population, maintenance works at the Jewish Cemetery, installation of a memorial plate inside of the Temple, presentation of a photo exhibition, printing of a comprehensive bilingual brochure in German and Romanian, and much more.

Romanian Media Coverage:
Monitorul de Suceava, July 18, 2017
NewsBucovina, July 17, 2017

Each and any assistance is highly appreciated. Donation account:
Förderverein “Verbundene RegS und GY Rostocker Heide e.V.”
IBAN: DE30130500000295001160
BIC: NOLADE21ROS
Verwendungszweck: AG Kriegsgräber

Emunah Czernowitz – “Heimkehr” Essays jüdischer Denker

Another of the Jewish fraternities was “Emunah”.  On June 3, 1903, the Jewish National Academic Reading Society was “thrown open,” with the club colors gold-violet-gold. “Emunah” was highly active in the field of Zionism – a  characteristic for all the Jewish fraternities –  and also set up a library open to the public. Furthermore, “Emunahs” intellectual athmosphere culminated in publishing several books. To mention is especially “Heimkehr. Essays jüdischer Denker”  with a preface by Leon Kellner. (Homecoming. Essays of Jewish Thinkers). This anthology contains contributions by notable Jewish authors like Balaban Majer, Nathan Birnbaum (who coined the term “Zionism”), Max Rosenfeld, Salomon Schiller and Leon Kellner. It came out 1912 and is now available online via the university library of Frankfurt: http://sammlungen.ub.uni-frankfurt.de/freimann/content/titleinfo/936863

heimkehr

JNAV Heatid Czernowitz

Hi all, i am currently worlking on a Research paper on Czernowitz Jewish academic fraternities. With “Hasmonäa”, founded 1891 by members of the Viennese “Kadimah”, this new type of Jewish academic fraternity appeared in Czernowitz and found successors throughout the German-speaking Universities. The Jewish academic fraternities were modeled after the traditional type of “Studentenverbindung”, that existed in Czernowitz from 1875-1938/40. The members of the various “frats” distinguished themselves by wearing ribbons and caps showing the club colors of their fraternity. In the Romanian period the University organisation was changed to the “college System” and members of the fraternities were issued membership cards. here i have got one issued by JNAV “Heatid” for Josef Stark in 1922. “Heatid” came into being in 1918/19 and existed until 1936. Its club colors used to be green-silver-black shown in the ribbons with white caps. Any further information on “Heatid”, Josef Stark or any of the Czernowitz fraternities – especially photographs – would be highly appreciated. Thank You!Heatid_Cz0001

Volunteers at the Czernowitz Jewish Cemetery in 2008

Obraz 024

On behalf of Joanna Liss: “This is a photo of the original group that worked in the cemetery in 2008, organized by Mimi Taylor and Christian Hermann. I’m the one in the black and white Escher t-shirt. The reason I am posting it now is because a few days ago I met up with Clare Fester, the redheaded woman next to me, in Boston. We hadn’t seen each other since the project. Clare is Australian. She became interested in learning Yiddish after we had the wonderful opportunity to attend a part of the Yiddish conference in Czernowitz while we were there. It was on the 100th anniversary of the original Czernowitz Yiddish conference in 1908.

Since then, Clare has become proficient in Yiddish, created her own major in Yiddish studies, has studied in Belarus and Lithuania, and also at the Yiddish Book Center in Massachusetts. She works for a Jewish organization that organizes Yiddish culture trips. She was in Boston attending a Jewish culture conference (and then meeting her mom and sister in New York, where they plan to visit Ellis Island, see Fiddler on the Roof, etc.).

What makes this all the more remarkable is that Clare isn’t Jewish, nor were any of the other participants in the group, other than me. One of the other group members, Katharina from Germany, wound up doing her thesis on Czernowitz. Another, Sophie from France, has worked for the UN. I am proud to have been a part of this remarkable and diverse group, and so glad that the cemetery project continues on.”